Henry Stoll

Scholar in Historical Musicology, United States

Henry Stoll is a PhD candidate in Historical Musicology at Harvard University. He holds an MPhil in Musicology from the University of Cambridge and a BM in Music and French from Rutgers University. His work addresses topics in the history of opera, Haiti, and the French Atlantic. His dissertation, The Carnival Mirror: Music and Parody in Early Haiti, 1804-1820, assembles a body of song parody, authored by a community of Haitian poets and musicians, to make known the value of music and mimicry in the first years of Haitian sovereignty. This project is supported by fellowships from Harvard University, the McNeil Center for Early American Studies, the John Carter Brown Library, and the Camargo Foundation.

Trip to Haiti, Sans-Souci Palace, 2019 © Henri Stoll

The Carnival Mirror: Music and Parody in Early Haiti, 1804-1820

The Carnival Mirror assembles a body of songs, authored by a community of Haitian poets and musicians, to make known the value of music and mimicry in the first years of Haitian sovereignty. Through the study of parodies, Haitian verses sung to French melodies, the project details how early Haitians drew from an indwelling songbook to glorify their leaders, condemn their tyrants, celebrate their genius, and revise their musical inheritance. Four sections provide the first music history of early Haiti and a compendium of Haitian musical source material.